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Guidance for 2020-2021 School Year

 

 

English Learners

To support educators working with English learners, the MDE has created guidance for distance learning that focuses on adapting instructional strategies related to the four language domains and best practices for EL students in a distance learning situation. This resource also provides guidance on issues related to Language Service Plans and SET meetings during distance learning.

Gifted Education

Intervention Services

1. How should we conduct our teacher support team meetings during this time?  

Whether or not a meeting is conducted will be determined by the number of weeks the school/district is closed as well as the time of year.  For example, if a school is closed for 3-5 weeks, meetings may be suspended until faculty and staff return. However, in a situation such as this extended closure in which students will not return for the remainder of the school year, it is recommended that districts hold virtual end-of-year meetings to review data and create end-of-year notes to be used when making decisions regarding student placement for the fall. When school resumes in the fall, meetings will be held to make decisions regarding Tier placement, utilizing available data in the decision-making process. 

2. What intervention support should be provided to students receiving Tier II or Tier III supports?  

During this time districts are encouraged to send home online access to any intervention programs that students are utilizing at school. They are also encouraged to send home any reading materials that can be used to reinforce interventions that the student received before the break. The reading materials should be on their reading level so as not cause frustration for the student. 

3. Will there be an extension for the kindergarten dyslexia screener due to the students being out of school?  

Due to the schools being closed, the kindergarten dyslexia screener will be waived for this school year. If you have already completed the kindergarten screener, please submit that data.

4. What supports should be provided to students receiving Tier II or Tier III intervention?   

During this time, districts are encouraged to send home online access to any intervention programs that students are utilizing at school, if available. Districts should also provide reading materials that can be used to reinforce interventions that the student received before the break. The reading materials should be on the student’s reading level so as not cause frustration for the student. 

5. How can districts support students receiving more intensive interventions such as dyslexia therapy?  

If possible, therapists should send home a copy of the card decks students use during dyslexia therapy so that parents can continue to review them with students. Districts should also send home packets of oral language skills, phonological awareness skills, and letter tiles for students to work on their alphabetizing skills. The goal is to offer supports that parents can provide to their students while they are at home. It is not recommended that they introduce new skills, but rather review the previously taught skills. Therapists may also provide recordings of themselves to show parents how to practice certain skills with their children. 

6. If a district is using an online resource for all students, what should be done for students in Tier II or Tier III? 

It is essential that specific deficit areas are on the student’s dashboard/assignment list for Tier II and Tier III. Documentation for how the student is progressing in those deficit areas is provided through the resource.

7. How can a district support students who do not have access to online interventions due to lack of a device or lack of access to the internet? 

Support should be given to students through paper printouts specifically related to the deficit area if they do not have access to the online intervention. Determine if the district has a technology “check-out” policy for devices or hotspots that can be utilized by students during extended school closure. 

8. What resources should a district provide for students receiving intervention? 

Consider sending home typical manipulatives used by students such as counters, geoboards, or other math materials. These types of materials might also be in the form of materials made by the school (e.g., counters made from construction paper cut into pieces). Additional resources might include decodable or leveled readers.

9. What types of data can be used for documenting student growth when making decisions while students are out of school? 

Acceptable data may include information such as reports from online interventions, collected and scored paper/pencil assignments specific to deficit areas, and/or student performance on virtual face-to-face assessments. These data points can be used for documenting student growth and decision making while students are out of school. 

Library Services

Textbooks